Friday Fictioneers: A soft edge to Hetty’s world

PHOTO PROMPT submitted by Courtney Wright. © Photographer prefers to remain anonymous.


 

There was a dent in the hedgerow, a patch where the hawthorn had died. Enough space for Hetty to sit, knees drawn up against the wind, patched boots out of the wet.

Such a day for wind. Sharp as a knife, cold as the stolen glances she’d had from the Goodwives in the last village – worn to the bone baggages the lot, pinched tight as the buns on their heads. Pity the husbands.

A first snowflake fell. Soon a layer of downy white drifted in the trackways, softening the hard edges of wall and gatepost.

Sleep. Just for a while …

 


Written for Rochelle Wisoff-Field’s Friday Fictioneers. See the pic and write a tale and don’t forget to read and comment on the other stories. See here to find out how.

 

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75 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers: A soft edge to Hetty’s world

  1. The tempo of this is perfect, mimicking the approach of slumber. I fear Hetty won’t wake up. But I don’t know – you paint her as a survivor, and in the hedge is warmer than out in the open. Lovely writing, Lynn.

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    1. Thank you so very much, Penny. Yes, a survivor and a feisty one I think – perhaps the wives of the village were right to look askance at her. Glad you felt the tone was right and thank you so much for the helpful comment

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    1. Thank you C! For some reason Goodwife stuck with me from reading The Crucible at school. Mind you, the rest of the story stuck pretty hard too. Thank you for the kind comment

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  2. The description of those Goodwives is so perfect! “Pinched as tight as the buns on their heads.” I can just see the whole disapproving flock of them.

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  3. She sounds a strong character, so hopefully she will move to a safer place. Sadly such places are more and more under pressure.

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    1. Very true, with so much green belt and brownfield sites being snatched up for development, there are few places where people can lie low undisturbed. Thank you for reading Mike

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  4. I can feel the eyes of those women weighing her down and hear a sigh as she wonders if she should care or not. Maybe a wee rest among the foliage then up she’ll get and carry on. I’m rooting for her. Gorgeous!

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    1. Ah, thank you Gabi for the lovely comment. Really, don’t apologise for the lateness – I’m often a week late replying these days. Not sure where the days go! Thank you for reading

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