Friday Fictioneers : Odd Fish

PHOTO PROMPT © Randy Mazie

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‘Odd Fish.’

The old women whispered as he passed the yard, rocking in their chairs, fanning damp faces with crimped newspaper. Samuel dipped his head, avoiding their dry, puckered gaze.

Clouds of dust rose as he crossed to the cemetery. Passing sharp, white headstones he reached a wooden cross in the shade. Taking out a well-thumbed book, he peered closely at the text.

‘Here’s the book I was telling you about, Mama.’

Clearing his throat, he read, ‘If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you’ll probably want to know is where I was born …’

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Written for Rochelle Wisoff-Field’s Friday Fictioneers. See here to join in, to read and comment on the other tales.

I’ve been away for a while and what a joy to be back in my blogging home.

Note – Samuel is reading the opening lines of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye.

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39 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers : Odd Fish

  1. You paint such a vivid picture in so few words, Lynn.

    And maybe I am slow today, but what is the significance of ‘Catcher’ here? It seems a strange book for what I assume is a young man to read to his mother.

    Like

    1. Thank you C. The Catcher reference was just my clumsy way of emphasising what an outsider Samuel is, and perhaps – considering others who have been captivated by Salinger’s story, mainly John Lennon’s assassin, Mark Chapman – those old biddies should watch who they’re gossiping about. Sorry if I was being a little too oblique for the word count. Thank you for your kind comment C

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think you are being far too harsh on yourself, Lynn. I was also captivated by Catcher back in the distant past, one of the iconic books of my teenage years. And it didn’t do me any…
        Oh never mind!

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      2. Haha! I must admit, I’ve never read it. Never entirely appealed to me, too gritty and not magical enough. And is there really a plot? I can imagine it a book I might admire but not like

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  2. Dear Lynn,

    I’m doing a happy dance to see you back in the FF queue. As always, you didn’t disappoint. I love the contrast between their damp faces and their dry gaze. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Your stories tell me every time’ There’s no lazy-way to good writing.’ Thanks for inspiring with your work.
    Admire the vivid detail in your story.

    Like

    1. I imagined him having discovered the book and wanting to share it with his mum, something that chimed closely with how he felt living in that community, one that made him feel an outsider. Thank you for reading Bjorn

      Like

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