What Pegman Saw: Folly

Image: Google Earth

‘What’s the point of it?’

The tower was five storeys high – bruised white washed walls, red corner stones, an onion dome roof.

Steph shook her head. ‘No point. Just a wealthy man showing off. That’s why they call them follies.’

Up close what had looked like a wooden door was just painted plaster, the grain worked in with a fine brush. It was cold under his hand, the surface slightly damp.

‘So, are there rooms inside?’ he said.

Steph peered at her guidebook. ‘Says here – the brick and plaster construction was thought to be solid until 1996 when a scan revealed a hollow chamber inside.’

Dai’s fringe flopped over his eyes. He gave her a lopsided smiled. ‘Like a burial chamber?’

Steph rested her hand on his, fingers curling round his. ‘Like a prison,’ she whispered.

***

Written for What Pegman Saw, the prompt that uses Google Street View as its jumping off point. This week we visit French Polynesia. See here to join in.

8 thoughts on “What Pegman Saw: Folly

    1. Oh, yes, what a chilling real life tale that is. The whole Holmes story sounds like a gruesome invention, all the more chilling because it was real. Glad you liked the story. And thanks for continuing to run Pegman – I enjoy taking part

      Like

  1. Beautifully constructed. The alternating voices of the dialogue let the story unfold very naturally. your closing sentence, “‘Like a prison,’ she whispered.” is really chilling.

    Like

  2. A wonderfully creepy take on a spooky photo — it almost looks black and white, as though something supernatural is sucking the color from the surroundings. Gives an ominous twist to the idea of a folly, too. I especially like the description of the “bruised” white-washed walls.

    Liked by 1 person

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